Manual Image and myth : a history of pictorial narration in Greek art

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Contents:
  1. Image and Myth: A History of Pictorial Narration in Greek Art
  2. A History of Pictorial Narration in Greek Art
  3. Article excerpt
  4. Image and Myth: A History of Pictorial Narration in Greek Art, Giuliani, O'Donnell

The gradual assimilation of images to texts — exemplified by South Italian red-figure vases with subjects from Athenian drama and the Hellenistic relief The Classical Review The history of earlier pictorial narration, by contrast, is described as a process of problem-solving contingent on the internal logic of image-making. To explore this process, G. Within this framework pictures are more suited for describing circum- stances while actions related in a sequence are the natural preserve of verbal communica- tion.

Archaic vase painters experimented with both modes of narration by combining and modifying pre-existing pictorial schemata and, sometimes, by adding inscriptions. But the polychronic mode gradually lost ground to the monochronic, probably because of the structural inconsistencies inherent in trying to show a whole story in one picture: how could one enjoy the suspense of a dramatic moment if its resolution was already visible? The resulting survey of narration in Greek vase-painting is a pleasure every student of Greek art and archaeology should have an opportunity to enjoy. Its main attractions are its heuristic economy and its non-evolutionist premise.

Geometric figure scenes are not inept attempts at depicting epic, as G.

Image and Myth: A History of Pictorial Narration in Greek Art

At the same time, it is clear that G. The Lessingian idea that images can only operate in either narrative or descriptive registers presupposes as G. If we abandon mimetic doctrine we must concede not only that narrative images are never free of description but also pace G. Since the category of descriptive action threatens to destabilise G. In this definition a representation of a whale hunt is narrative only if individual protagonists are nameable, and giving birth is never a narrative since the actions of women unless they are tragic do not have the potential of subverting the social norms in which the actions take place.

A History of Pictorial Narration in Greek Art

I doubt anyone outside classical studies would entertain such a phallocentric definition of narrative. Although G. In other words paraphrasing Marx his book may change our understanding of how the Greeks narrated myth visually, but it will not change the way we narrate our myths about antiquity. The self-imposed restrictions in historical and theoretical engagement have already gener- ated fruitful dialogues: for example S.

Art and the Alphabet in the Times of the Dipylon Master

Muth, A. Staehli and B. University of Chicago Press: E.

Article excerpt

About Contact News Giving to the Press. Believing and Seeing Roland Recht. Sculpture Johann Gottfried Herder. On museum visits, we pass by beautiful, well-preserved vases from ancient Greece—but how often do we understand what the images on them depict? In Image and Myth , Luca Giuliani tells the stories behind the pictures, exploring how artists of antiquity had to determine which motifs or historical and mythic events to use to tell an underlying story while also keeping in mind the tastes and expectations of paying clients.

Covering the range of Greek style and its growth between the early Archaic and Hellenistic periods, Giuliani describes the intellectual, social, and artistic contexts in which the images were created.

He reveals that developments in Greek vase painting were driven as much by the times as they were by tradition—the better-known the story, the less leeway the artists had in interpreting it. Geometric figure scenes are not inept attempts at depicting epic, as G.

Greek Art History from Goodbye-Art Academy

At the same time, it is clear that G. The Lessingian idea that images can only operate in either narrative or descriptive registers presupposes as G. If we abandon mimetic doctrine we must concede not only that narrative images are never free of description but also pace G. Since the category of descriptive action threatens to destabilise G.

In this definition a representation of a whale hunt is narrative only if individual protagonists are nameable, and giving birth is never a narrative since the actions of women unless they are tragic do not have the potential of subverting the social norms in which the actions take place. I doubt anyone outside classical studies would entertain such a phallocentric definition of narrative. Although G. In other words paraphrasing Marx his book may change our understanding of how the Greeks narrated myth visually, but it will not change the way we narrate our myths about antiquity.

The self-imposed restrictions in historical and theoretical engagement have already gener- ated fruitful dialogues: for example S. Muth, A.

Image and Myth: A History of Pictorial Narration in Greek Art, Giuliani, O'Donnell

Staehli and B. Borg have explored the social background of the sixth-century changes in visual narration; G. Manuwald and A. Squire has extended the typological scope of post-classical material to question the alleged textual pri- macy in ancient visual culture. Although a bibliographical guide to such responses would have been welcome, this should not distract from the immense service the publisher has done to the discipline with this beautifully illustrated and accessible translation. Related Papers.

Klaus Speidel: "How single pictures tell stories. A critical introduction to narrative pictures and the problem of iconic narrative in narratology". By Klaus Speidel.